91.5 KRCC's Looking Up Each week Hal Bidlack from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society alerts Southern Colorado listeners what to watch for in our night skies.
91.5 KRCC's Looking Up

91.5 KRCC's Looking Up

From 91.5 KRCC

Each week Hal Bidlack from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society alerts Southern Colorado listeners what to watch for in our night skies.More from 91.5 KRCC's Looking Up »

Most Recent Episodes

Looking Up: One More Time...

On this week's Looking Up Hal points out the meteoric rise of GZ (short for comet Giacobini-Zinner) a celestial visitor visible in the Colorado sky this month. Comets, you recall, are often called dirty snowballs in space. They are made up of the original materials from the formation of the solar system, and thus are some of the oldest things out there. Trillions of comets slowly circle the Sun way, way out there, many times farther than Pluto, in a cloud of comets known as the Oort Cloud. Some

Looking Up: A Big Baby Begs For Attention

When you're No. 2 you have to shine a little harder. This week on Looking Up we learn of the 2nd brightest, but much lesser known star in the constellation Aquila. If you've listened to Looking Up for the past three years or so, you may have noticed that sometimes I talk about really obvious things, like, say, the Moon or the Sun, or Jupiter or Saturn. And other times, I tell you about very obscure things that you likely have never heard of. I do the latter for two reasons. First, I think some

Looking Up: Cosmic Debris

The Perseid Meteor Shower is back and the 2018 edition could be a banner event as we learn on Looking Up this week.

Looking Up: The God Of War Is Getting Rusty

This week Mars will be as big as the full moon (as long as it's viewed through a telescope at about 100x magnification). There's a rusty planet up on the Southern Colorado sky right now that is definitely worth taking a look at, because you'll won't see it this well again until 2035. I'm talking about Mars, and as it turns out, the orbits of Mars and the Earth are such that right now, Mars is about as close as it ever gets to Earth. In more "normal" years, so to speak, Mars is still a pretty

Looking Up: There May Be Snow On The Roof...

But there's still fire, or some mysterious heat source, deep in the belly of Pluto, as we learn on Looking Up this week. OK, I admit it, I'm a sucker for Pluto. The diminutive dwarf planet has always fascinated me, and I still clearly remember a few years ago when I was able to actually observe the tiny speck of light that is Pluto through my own telescope.

Looking Up: 8 Days A Week Was Not Enough...

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout takes time to explain calender reformation. We again mark a calendar to help us break up our revolution around the sun into smaller more manageable portions. Calendars are funny things in that keeping them and naming their parts lends to strange things.

Looking Up: A Spot That's Hard To Spot

It's a good week to try and find the closest planet to our sun. Often times, the brightest objects in the sky are our fellow planets. Jupiter, Saturn, and especially Venus blaze in the night sky. But the most elusive of all the planets to see might well be one that isn't farthest from the Sun, but rather is closest, the remarkable planet Mercury.

Looking Up: At The Shadow The Time Will Be...

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout sheds some light and some shadow on the origins of the sundial. As we have discussed before, timekeeping is an essential part of Astronomy. The ancients relied on very low tech for many methods to tell time. One effective method divides the day into relevant parts. Let's shine a little light on the Sundial.

Looking Up: Miss Beehiven

This week on Looking Up Venus entertains the Beehive Cluster in a celestial gathering of lovely and luminous objects. Have you been wondering what that really bright star-like thing is in the western sky after sundown? Well, it's the planet Venus, the third brightest thing in our sky, after the Sun and the Moon.

Looking Up: Objects In (Telescope) Mirror May Be Closer Than They Appear

This week on Looking Up we are introduced to Barnard's Star. There is a lovely constellation in the Southern Colorado sky right now, with the awkward name of Ophiuchus. And in Ophiuchus is a remarkable star with the unusually possessive name of Barnard's Star.

Looking Up: Objects In (Telescope) Mirror May Be Closer Than They Appear

Back To Top
superuser.com, chron.com, lefigaro.fr, wikiwiki.jp, abcnews.go.com, php.net, nbcnews.com, instructables.com, lenta.ru, hespress.com,