Code Switch
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Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

What's So Wrong With African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

Is it cool for African-Americans to wear African tribal prints? Hana Baba and Leila Day of "The Stoop" podcast tackle the question.Neema Iyer for The Stoophide caption

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Neema Iyer for The Stoop

What's So Wrong With African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

Leila Day and Hana Baba are hosts of a new podcast called The Stoop. It features conversations black people have amongst themselves — but rarely in public. The pair swing by to talk with Shereen and Gene about their show, and share an episode about a very thorny question: Can African-Americans wear clothing and accessories that originated with African cultures they're not familiar with?

What's So Wrong With African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

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A Police Video From Charlotte

In the era of body-cams and cellphones, the act of seeing police do their job is radically altering the public-police relationship, and changing civilian and police behavior and perceptions alike.Chelsea Beck/NPRhide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

A Police Video From Charlotte

This encore presentation goes deep on a case involving a white police officer and an unarmed black man in Charlotte, NC. Videos in police-involved shootings can add detail to these cases, but as our colleague Kelly McEvers of the Embedded podcast reports, what you see depends on who you are.

A Police Video From Charlotte

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 The Supreme Court Decides In Favor Of A Racial Slur...Now What?

Joe Jiang (left) and Simon Tam of The Slants, an Asian American band whose name is a racial slur, were in a legal battle over their band's name. The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided in the favor of trademark protection for The Slants.Ariel Zambelich/NPRhide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

The Supreme Court Decides In Favor Of A Racial Slur...Now What?

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided in favor of Simon Tam, front man of the band The Slants. The group has been fighting the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for nearly a decade, for the right to use the slur.

The Supreme Court Decides In Favor Of A Racial Slur...Now What?

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It's Our Anniversary
Chelsea Beck/NPR

It's Our Anniversary

Shereen and Gene celebrate our first year on the podcast. We take a look back to some memorable stories with updates from the team and some of our guests.

It's Our Anniversary

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What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

Protesters gather outside the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., Friday, June 16, 2017, after St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez was cleared in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile.Steve Karnowski/APhide caption

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Steve Karnowski/AP

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

In the aftermath of the acquittal of the officer who shot and killed Philando Castile, Gene and Shereen speak to a reporter who has followed the case since the beginning. We also speak to a friend of Castile's.

What To Make Of Philando Castile's Death, One Year Later

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Encore: 'You're A Grand Old Flag'

At an anti-Donald Trump protest in Anaheim, Calif. last year, before the election, "Anthony" and "America" said they saved the U.S. flag from a Trump supporter who was trying to get Latinos to trample it.Adrian Florido/NPRhide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

Encore: 'You're A Grand Old Flag'

Why do some people of color embrace the American flag while others refuse to wave it? In this episode from the Code Switch archives, Gene Demby and Adrian Florido unpack the complicated patriotism and evolving use of the flag with immigrant rights protesters and Native American veterans.

Encore: 'You're A Grand Old Flag'

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A Prescription For "Racial Imposter Syndrome"

"Racial imposter syndrome" is definitely "a thing," for many people. Shereen and Gene hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Social scientists weigh in the need basic need for belonging.Kristen Uroda for NPRhide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

A Prescription For "Racial Imposter Syndrome"

Shereen and Gene look at "racial imposter syndrome." It's what one listener described as feeling fake, or inauthentic, in her identity. We invited listeners to write in, and hundreds of bi-racial and multi-cultural people shared their views. We'll also talk to social scientists about the basic need for belonging and the role language plays in identity. Later, writer Heidi Durrow joins us. She's founder of The Mixed-Remixed Festival, the largest annual gathering of its kind in the U.S.

A Prescription For "Racial Imposter Syndrome"

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'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'

Code Switch looks into the underworld of white techno music producers in Detroit to pass themselves off as the original black artists/creators of the genre in order to sell their music. In some instances, they're even stealing the original musician's name and passing off as the creators of the music.Chelsea Beck/NPRhide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'

This week, we follow the strange trend of white dance-music DJs who pass themselves off as black artists. Gene talks to legendary House music DJ Ron Trent. The European producer Guy Tavares chimes in from The Netherlands on what he sees as overhyped controversy. Piotr Orlov, who covers dance music for NPR weighs in on what this all means for music fans.

'Give It Up For DJ Blackface!'

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 We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"

Alex Tizon and Lola, whose full name was Eudocia Tomas Pulido, photographed in Manila.Courtesy of Melissa Tizonhide caption

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Courtesy of Melissa Tizon

We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"

This week, we join the global conversation on The Atlantic's essay "My Family's Slave," in which Alex Tizon writes about Eudocia Tomas Pulido, who was his family's katulong, or domestic servant, for 56 years. Why did Eudocia's story hit such a raw nerve in the U.S. and the Philippines? Shereen and Gene talk to Vicente Rafael, a professor who has studied and written about the practice in his native Philippines. We also hear from Lydia Catina Amaya, a Filipina who was a katulong in the Philippines and the United States. And we talk to Melissa Tizon, the author's widow. Eudocia Tomas Pulido lived in their home for the last 12 years of her life.

We're Still Talking About "My Family's Slave"

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Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah

This week's podcast extra from Code Switch: Japanese Americans who avoided internment camps in the second world war.Chelsea Beck/NPRhide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah

The story of over 100,000 Japanese Americans enduring life in internment camps during WW II is well known, but a few thousand avoided the camps, entirely by, essentially, self-exiling. Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates talks with research historian Diana Tsuchida, about the hidden history of Japanese Americans who survived by creating farming communities, like the one in Keetley, Utah. We also hear directly from survivors about life as internally displaced American citizens.

Japanese Americans Exiled In Utah

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