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Survey Finds Widespread 'Moral Distress' Among Veterinarians

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgement.Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Imageshide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images
Midterm Election Could Reshape Health Policy

Demonstrators hold signs as Democratic leaders speak with reporters outside the U.S. Capitol June 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C.Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Imageshide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Midterm Election Could Reshape Health Policy

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After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever

"We have only begun to scratch the surface of the complex problems inherent in figuring out ... the brain's inner workings," said Paul Allen in 2012.Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Imageshide caption

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Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images
CDC Investigates Cases Of Rare Neurological 'Mystery Illness' In Kids

"I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts, we haven't been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Imageshide caption

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James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Cases Of Rare Neurological 'Mystery Illness' In Kids

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NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Alice Goldfarb/NPRhide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall.Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Imageshide caption

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Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images

Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky.alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RFhide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe.David Paul Morris/Getty Imageshide caption

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David Paul Morris/Getty Images

As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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