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Germany's Political Earthquake: Making Sense Of The Right Shift In Elections

AfD top candidates Alexander Gauland, left, and Alice Weidel celebrate with their supporters during the election party of the nationalist Alternative for Germany, in Berlin, Sunday, after the polling stations for the parliament elections closed.Martin Meissner/APhide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP
Angela Merkel Wins Mandate For 4th Term Despite Diluted Support

German Chancellor and Christian Democrat Angela Merkel appears to have lost some support because of her refugee policy that allowed more than a million asylum seekers into the country since 2015.Sean Gallup/Getty Imageshide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images
As Voters Head To The Polls, Germans Continue To Grapple With Identity

Mohammed Eh'tai fled Syria a couple of years ago. He has been reunited with wife Rawah, holding a doll that is one of the only items from their old life in Syria, and their daughter Rimas.Arezou Rezvani/NPRhide caption

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Arezou Rezvani/NPR
In German Election, Campaign Posters Are More Important Than TV Ads

A poster in Essen showing women in traditional German dress promotes the far-right party Alternative for Germany. The poster says, "Colorful variety? We have already."Martin Meissner/APhide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP
Far-Right German Party Could Lead Opposition After Sunday's Election

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, leading candidates of the right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party, stand near an AfD poster that reads: "Crime Through Immigration, The Refugee Wave Leaves Behind Clues!" Sept. 18 in Berlin.Sean Gallup/Getty Imageshide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images
What To Know About The Independence Referendum In Iraqi Kurdistan

Kurds wave Israeli flags at a Kurdish independence rally. Israel is the only country in the region to support the referendum.Jane Arraf/NPRhide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

What To Know About The Independence Referendum In Iraqi Kurdistan

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Here's What You Need To Know About Germany's Election

Billboards featuring German Chancellor Angela Merkel (center) and Martin Schulz (left), leader of Germany's Social Democratic Party and candidate for chancellor, are pictured in Berlin on Sept. 17.John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Imageshide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images
Why The Race To Oust ISIS From Deir Ez-Zor In Syria May Present New Dangers

Smoke rises from buildings in the area of Bughayliyah, on the northern outskirts of Deir ez-Zor on Sept. 13, as Syrian forces advance during their ongoing battle against ISIS.George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Imageshide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images
Once A Contender, Angela Merkel's Main Rival Stumbles As Election Approaches

Martin Schulz, former president of the European Parliament, speaks in Potsdam, Germany, last week. He is Chancellor Angela Merkel's main challenger in Germany's upcoming federal elections.Steffi Loos/AFP/Getty Imageshide caption

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Steffi Loos/AFP/Getty Images

Once A Contender, Angela Merkel's Main Rival Stumbles As Election Approaches

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How The CIA Found A Soviet Sub — Without The Soviets Knowing

The Hughes Glomar Explorer off the coast of Catalina Island, Calif., in August 1975, a year after its secret CIA mission to raise a Soviet sub that sank in the Pacific Ocean. This was one of the CIA's most elaborate and expensive operations. The CIA has just declassified new documents that show the Soviets were suspicious, but never actually knew what the Americans were doing.APhide caption

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AP

How The CIA Found A Soviet Sub — Without The Soviets Knowing

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As East Mosul Comes Back To Life, West Mosul Remains In Ruins

A few families are returning to heavily damaged neighborhoods on the outskirts of Mosul's old city. The residents must be cleared by a committee that certifies they are not ISIS members before they start to move back to repair their homes.Jane Arraf/NPRhide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

As East Mosul Comes Back To Life, West Mosul Remains In Ruins

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Some Analysts Say Time May Be Right For A Rethink On North Korean Nuclear Crisis

People at the Seoul Railway Station in the South Korean capital watch a TV report on North Korea's missile launch on Friday, days after the U.N. Security Council adopted new sanctions against Pyongyang.Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Imageshide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images
Let Them Eat Rabbit Is Venezuelan President's Response To Food Shortages

In an effort to combat chronic food shortages, President Nicolas Maduro and his ministers are embarking on a campaign to convince Venezuelans to eat rabbits.GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Imageshide caption

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GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Images
Access To Military Sites Debated As White House Reconsiders Iran Nuclear Deal

President Hassan Rouhani addresses Iran's Parliament on Aug. 20. He said the top foreign policy priority for his new government would be to protect the nuclear deal.STR/AFP/Getty Imageshide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images
Prime Minister Abbasi: Degrading Pakistan Hurts U.S. Fight Against Militants

Pakistan's prime minister, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi (shown here Aug. 1), says that U.S. sanctions against Pakistan will only hurt its efforts to fight militants in the region.Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Imageshide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images
France's Brittany Sees New Wave Of Brits Post-Brexit

Bea (right) and Maggie Ordever outside their bed-and-breakfast in Seglien, France. The couple moved last October from southeastern England to this village in Brittany, in the western region in France, which has historical ties to Great Britain.Courtesy of Bea and Maggie Ordever/NPRhide caption

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Courtesy of Bea and Maggie Ordever/NPR

France's Brittany Sees New Wave Of Brits Post-Brexit

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'Not A Textbook Case': Barcelona Attackers' Hometown Wonders How It Bred Terrorists

Members of the local Muslim community gather along with relatives of young men believed responsible for the attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils to denounce terrorism in Ripoll, Spain, on Aug. 20.Francisco Seco/APhide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

'Not A Textbook Case': Barcelona Attackers' Hometown Wonders How It Bred Terrorists

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In Hokkaido, Being In North Korea's Missile Flight Path Means Cold War-Era Drills

Elementary school students in Iwamizawa, a town in Japan's Hokkaido prefecture, take part in a missile drill.Elise Hu/NPRhide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In Hokkaido, Being In North Korea's Missile Flight Path Means Cold War-Era Drills

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18 Years After Turkey's Deadly Quake, Safety Concerns Grow About The Next Big One

Earthquake survivors look at a collapsed building in Istanbul in August 1999. The magnitude 7.4 quake killed 17,000 people across northwestern Turkey.Eyal Warshavsky/APhide caption

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Eyal Warshavsky/AP