NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

What Can A Personality Test Tell Us About Who We Are?

Corrected on February 21, 2018

In the audio for this story, interviewee Adam Grant gives inaccurate definitions of scientific reliability and validity. According to the American Psychological Association, validity is defined as "t]he extent to which a test measures what it was intended to measure." The APA defines reliability as "[t]he degree to which a test produces similar scores each time it is used; stability or consistency of the scores produced by an instrument."

Weekend Edition Saturday

Rep. Jackie Speier On Indictment Of Russians

Corrected on February 18, 2018

In an earlier version of this post, Rep. Speier was identified as representing Florida. She represents California.

How The U.S. Ambassador To China May Have Xi Jinping's Ear

Corrected on February 18, 2018

A previous version of this story said President Trump's son Eric Trump ran the then-candidate Trump's election campaign in Iowa. It was then-Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad's son Eric Branstad who led the Iowa campaign.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: End Rhymes

Corrected on February 18, 2018

A previous version of this puzzle featured the wrong challenge for next week.

All Things Considered

Is There Any Way For Schools To Prevent Shootings?

Corrected on February 15, 2018

In a previous audio version of this story, we incorrectly said there has never been a female school shooter. In fact, there have been some females who committed school shootings.

Democrats Take Republican Seat In Florida Special Election

Corrected on February 14, 2018

A previous version of this story and caption incorrectly said that Margaret Good's victory was by 7 percent and that the district had previously voted for President Trump by 5 percent. Those numbers are actually percentage points.

Attorney Says He Paid Adult Film Actress Who Alleges Affair With Trump

Corrected on February 14, 2018

An earlier summary of this report on the homepage mistakenly stated that attorney Michael Cohen said his $130,000 payment was reimbursed by either the Trump campaign or the Trump Organization. In fact, he has said the payment was not reimbursed by either the campaign or the Trump Organization and that it came from his own pocket.

White House Budget Calls For Deep Cuts To HUD

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In an earlier version of this story, we misstated the source for a figure. The Trump administration, not Congress, added $2 billion to its earlier HUD funding request.

All Things Considered

Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Why People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 14, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Trump To Unveil Long-Awaited $1.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

Corrected on February 13, 2018

Administration officials say the president's plan commits $200 billion in federal funding over 10 years to stimulate state and local spending and private investment. A previous version of this story incorrectly said $200 million.

Ask Me Another

Paradigm Shift

Corrected on February 13, 2018

In one clue, we refer to ticks as insects. Ticks are arachnids.

3 Killed In Grand Canyon Helicopter Crash

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In a previous version of this story and headline, NPR reported that four people had been killed. The correct number of casualties is three dead and four injured.

New Leader Of Sinn Fein Looks At Fresh Start For Party

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In a previous version of this story and headline, we incorrectly said that Mary Lou McDonald is the first female leader of Sinn Fein. In fact, Margaret Buckley led the party from 1937 to 1950.

All Things Considered

'A Fantastic Woman' Is As Strong And Complicated As Its Star

Corrected on February 12, 2018

An earlier version of this story used the incorrect pronoun "him" in the sentence "And she's adamant that Marina not attend Orlando's funeral, something she emphasizes by always addressing her as Daniel."

Episode 363: Why People Do Bad Things

Corrected on February 12, 2018

In this story, we refer to Toby Groves' lie in 2004 on his mortgage loan application as "his first bad act." We should have noted that according to court records, Groves admitted that he began the "scheme" to defraud banks "on or about June 30, 2003." In addition, court records show he admitted to owing the federal Internal Revenue Service $299,997 for claims made about the tax years 2001-2003.

Also in this story, Groves discusses what he sees as a key moment in his life — his brother's 1986 bank fraud conviction. Groves describes what he says was his father's anguish over a front-page newspaper story. Our Web coverage includes illustrations that make it appear as if a photo of Groves' brother was on the front page and that the family's name was in the headline. But archives show that the Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage did not include a front-page image of Groves' brother. The family's name was not in the headline. Instead, the brother's name appeared inside the newspaper.

The details about others in this report — including researchers Lamar Pierce, Francesca Gino and Ann Tenbrunsel — are not in question.

The blog Paul Vanderveen's Attitude of Reciprocity drew NPR's attention back to this story.

Women In The Music Industry Call For 'Evolution' At The Grammys

Corrected on February 9, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that the Recording Academy has never asked its members to provide demographic data about themselves. NARAS does collect demographic data on its membership, but does not require that members provide that information. As a result, it does not have complete data on its membership.

NARAS added that it does not collect demographic information on Grammy winners or nominees.

The Difficult Math Of Being Native American

Corrected on February 8, 2018

A previous version of this essay may have implied that the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe uses blood quantum requirements for enrollment. This is not the case.

2 Trade Shows, 2 Portraits Of The American Conservation Movement

Corrected on February 8, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the Great American Outdoor Show is free to all National Rifle Association members. It is free only to new members or to those who renew or upgrade their membership in the NRA.

Weekend Edition Sunday

How To Ease Tensions At Dueling Rallies: Talk

Corrected on February 7, 2018

This report incorrectly refers to a group of demonstrators as Mothers Demand Common Sense For Gun Reform. The correct name is Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Morning Edition

Luger Erin Hamlin Plans To Have Fun During Her 4th Olympics

Corrected on February 6, 2018

In this report, we say that Erin Hamlin's medal in Sochi marked the first time an American luger reached an Olympic podium. In fact, while she is the first U.S. singles luger to win a medal, there have been U.S. doubles lugers who have won medals.

All Things Considered

Candidates In San Francisco Mayoral Race Show How Much Tech Has Changed The City

Corrected on February 5, 2018

In this report, we say Brad Chapin was among dozens of people testifying in support of London Breed, San Francisco's acting mayor. As Chapin said at a public meeting, he believes the acting or appointed mayor should be a woman of color such as Breed. But his preferred candidate for mayor in the June election is a different city supervisor, Jane Kim.

Woman Reported Missing In California Found On 'The Bachelor'

Corrected on February 3, 2018

A caption on a previous version of this story incorrectly spelled Rebekah Martinez's first name as Rebecca. In addition, we incorrectly said there were two dozen contestants on Season 22 of The Bachelor. There were 29.

Morning Edition

Wave Of Capitalist Optimism Sweeps Across Paris

Corrected on January 31, 2018

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say the Station F space covers 110,000 square feet. In fact, it's 366,000 square feet.

Living Well Now: What Does It Take?

Corrected on January 31, 2018

A previous version of this post said 10 planetary boundaries have been identified. In fact, nine have been identified.

All Things Considered

Director Of ICE Discusses Immigration Enforcement And Proposals

Corrected on January 29, 2018

In the interview, Thomas Homan said ICE "will not turn a blind eye to somebody that we find during our enforcement operations that's in the country illegally." A previous version of the transcript was incorrect. He did not say "in the country legally."

Weekend Edition Saturday

School Shootings Are Sad, But No Longer Surprising

Corrected on January 27, 2018

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that at least 16 people were shot in addition to the two fatalities. Not all of those who were injured were shot.

A Superhero Movie Got A Screenplay Nomination: Glitch Or Game-Changer?

Corrected on January 25, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Spider-Man 2 was only nominated for sound mixing and visual effects. In fact, it won for visual effects and was nominated for both sound mixing and sound editing. In addition, the story also said The Incredibles won for best animated feature in 2004. The movie was released in 2004 but won its Oscar in 2005. Also, the story said The Dark Knight was passed over for best picture in 2008. The movie came out in 2008, but the nominations and awards show were in 2009.

All Things Considered

Culture Is Shifting in Socially Conservative Ireland

Corrected on January 25, 2018

In this story, we say that more than 700 women sought abortions in England or Wales in 2016. In fact, 3,265 women from the Republic of Ireland went there for abortions, and that covers only those who provided clinics with Irish addresses.

Previously posted on Jan. 8: We say that Irish voters elected a gay, biracial prime minister. In fact, Leo Varadkar was chosen by members of the governing party, Fine Gael, to be leader of their party after the election — and he became Ireland's taoiseach (prime minister) as a result of that party vote.

Morning Edition

When Dating Felt Like A Job, One Woman Hired A Matchmaker

Corrected on January 23, 2018

A previous version of this Web story said Three Day Rule's database of singles came from partnerships with online dating sites. The company's singles database is separate from its online dating site partnerships.

Morning Edition

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

Corrected on January 23, 2018

Previous audio and Web versions of this story suggested that Americans are no longer legally required to buy health insurance. That's incorrect. The individual mandate to buy health insurance that was part of the Affordable Care Act — requiring Americans to buy health insurance or face a financial penalty — is still in effect until 2019. Additionally, former President Barack Obama's first name was misspelled as Barak.

Government Hurtles Toward Midnight Shutdown

Corrected on January 19, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said Democrats would support a stopgap measure for three to five days to keep the government running. Van Hollen said they would support a stopgap measure of three to four days. Additionally, Mitch McConnell was incorrectly identified as the Senate minority leader. He is the majority leader.

Morning Edition

Women's Marches Across The Country Will Focus On The Vote

Corrected on January 19, 2018

An earlier Web version of this story quoted Bob Bland as saying Nevada voted for a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time in 2016. Nevada is a longtime swing state that went to Barack Obama in both the 2008 and 2012 elections.

Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

Corrected on January 19, 2018

A previous version of this story stated that Americans will burn 3 billion gallons of diesel fuel made from soybean oil this year. In fact, some of that biodiesel will be made from other oils, including corn oil, canola oil and recycled cooking oil.

DACA Troubles Could Put Spending Bill In Peril

Corrected on January 18, 2018

An earlier version of this story erroneously stated the DACA program will end in March 2017. The correct date for the end of the program is March 2018, absent a new law codifying it or a further delay of its termination by the Trump administration.

All Things Considered

Thriving After Prematurity, Fiona The Celebrity Hippo Turns 1

Corrected on January 17, 2018

A previous Web and audio version of this story said the sale of Fiona-related items generated about $3 million for the zoo. However, the $2 million to $3 million number refers to the estimated boost to the local economy from the Fiona-related sales and tourism.

All Things Considered

White House Physician Says Trump Is In 'Excellent Health'

Corrected on January 17, 2018

We say President Trump's cognitive test took 30 minutes to complete. In fact, the White House physician did not say how long the test lasted. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment typically takes about 10 minutes.

Mormon Church Names Russell M. Nelson As New Leader

Corrected on January 16, 2018

A previous version of this story said Russell M. Nelson has 116 grandchildren. In fact, Nelson has 116 great-grandchildren. Additionally, we also quoted Russell M. Nelson as saying, "Two days ago, my brethren of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles laid hands upon my hands." In fact, Nelson said "laid hands upon my head."

Morning Edition

Study: Great Recession Led To Fewer Deaths

Corrected on January 16, 2018

A previous headline incorrectly said that the Great Recession led to fewer deaths among the unemployed. In fact, the decline in mortality is not limited to the unemployed.

The Grunge Gold Rush

Corrected on January 12, 2018

An earlier version of this story used reporting citing the band Cell as having had received a $15 million advance from its label. The band's manager later corrected the figure to $1.5 million.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Rash Of Troubles At The Census Bureau

Corrected on January 11, 2018

In this story, we say that the Census Bureau's then-director left in May 2017. In fact, he left the bureau in June after his departure was announced in May.

Adding Citizenship Question Risks 'Bad Count' For 2020 Census, Experts Warn

Corrected on January 10, 2018

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the only field test of the 2020 census questions is set to begin in April in Rhode Island's Providence County. The Census Bureau has conducted previous tests of potential questions, and participants in Providence County can take part in the last scheduled field test beginning in March.

Morning Edition

Some Fear 'The Wire' Will Overshadow Showtime's 'The Chi'

Corrected on January 4, 2018

The audio of this story describes Papa, Jake and Kevin as elementary school students. They're actually eighth-graders, but in Chicago, kindergarten through eighth grade is referred to as elementary school.

How Cold Is Too Cold For Pets?

Corrected on January 3, 2018

An earlier Web version of this story credited some information to the American Veterinary Medical Foundation. The information came from the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Fusion GPS Wants Congressional Testimony Made Public

Corrected on January 3, 2018

During this conversation, we mistakenly say that The New York Times reported George Papadopoulos told an Australian diplomat about a meeting between Trump campaign officials and Russian officials. In fact, the Times reported that Papadopoulos told the diplomat that Russia had collected potentially damaging information about Democratic political candidate Hillary Clinton.

Morning Edition

Brexit Puts London's Finance Jobs At Risk

Corrected on January 3, 2018

An earlier transcript referred to Luxembourg for Finance as a government bank. In fact, it is the agency for the development of the Luxembourg financial center.

All Things Considered

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch Announces Retirement, With Speculation Focused On Romney

Corrected on January 3, 2018

A previous version of this story said that if Mitt Romney ran for Senate from Utah, it would be his first run for Congress. Romney ran for Senate in 1994, losing to Massachusetts Democrat Edward Kennedy. Additionally, Orrin Hatch and Thad Cochran were incorrectly referred to as Senate pro tempore. The correct term is president pro tempore.

The original story incorrectly stated that Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida came in second place in the 2016 Utah GOP caucuses. It was Gov. John Kasich of Ohio.

The Other WWII American-Internment Atrocity

Corrected on January 3, 2018

A reference to all Aleut villages being burned as part of a "scorched earth" policy has been removed because not all the villages were, in fact, burned.

A reference to a quote from a video has been removed because the online transcript of that documentary does not include the quote, in which an Army officer purportedly told Aleuts that "y'all look like Japs."

Details about how and when Aleuts were moved from their villages were removed to clarify that they were not all transported at the same time.

A reference to "Excursion Bay" was fixed to say "Excursion Inlet."

The year the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians was established was 1980, not 1988 as originally published.

A correction posted here on Feb. 22 has been removed because it mistakenly stated that President Reagan signed that commission into law. In fact, it was President Carter.

Weekend Edition Sunday

South Sudan's Prospects For 2018

Corrected on January 2, 2018

In this story, Nikki Haley is described incorrectly as the U.S. ambassador to the United States. In fact, she is the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: New Names In The News

Corrected on January 2, 2018

On an earlier Web page, puzzle winner Nick England was mistakenly referred to as Nick English.

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